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In performing in Medea and Dido and Aeneas, what are you most looking forward to?

I’m looking forward to a season of ‘firsts’. Dido and Medea, surprisingly, are two pieces that I have yet to perform. It will be a thrill to be supporting a cast of friends and colleagues with whom I have shared the stage on many occasions. Both Belinda and Nérine are confidants to the title characters in Dido and Medea respectively. It’s a welcome challenge to play the support figure of a tragic character and I look forward to seeing what parallels I can draw between the two.

Meghan Lindsay as Amour (centre) with Mireille Lebel and Peggy Kriha Dye in Orpheus and Eurydice (2015). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

Meghan Lindsay as Amour (centre) with Mireille Lebel and Peggy Kriha Dye in Orpheus and Eurydice (2015). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

What is special about performing with Opera Atelier?

Everything is special about performing with Opera Atelier! I truly believe that this is one of the few opera companies in the world that functions as such a unit. The entire cast and crew’s dedication to the process is what makes their productions so stunning. OA is like a family. Marshall and Jeannette are champions for Canadian artists and I am very thankful to have their support.

Meghan Lindsay with Artists of Atelier Ballet in Alcina (2014). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

Meghan Lindsay as Alcina with Artists of Atelier Ballet in Alcina (2014). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

Do you like Charpentier/French baroque music? And why?

I adore French baroque music. The focus on text and story is what makes this music so unique – it really propels the drama.  Performing French baroque music at the Palace of Versailles is a dream. It will be wonderful to return with this piece.

Meghan Lindsay in Der Freischutz (The Marksman) (2012). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

Meghan Lindsay as Agathe in Der Freischutz (The Marksman) (2012). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

Do you like Purcell, and why?

It’s great to sing English music by a composer with a great sensibility for word painting. Like Lully, and some of the French Baroque masters, did with the French language, Purcell had a great grasp on writing music in English. This makes both the dramatic and comedic moments in a piece very poignant.

Meghan Lindsay as Donna Anna with the company of Don Giovanni (2011). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

Meghan Lindsay as Donna Anna with the company of Don Giovanni (2011). Photo by Bruce Zinger.

 

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